Category Archives: Maven

Getting Started with Camel, Java, and Spring

At home and at work, I find that the things that I have to do over and over are the most painful. At home, it’s the dishes; at work, it reading data out of a file or doing Hibernate mappings. No matter what I do, I can’t seem to escape them, even while, for the most part, the inventors of the tools I use have done a pretty good job of making the work less of a chore.

At a recent job, I was asked to do some comma-separated value (CSV) file processing. A Microsoft Access power user was going to be running some queries, and our business users wanted to alter the behavior of our system based off the records that he found. Multiple files were going to be produced each day, and dropped off in a directory where I could pick them up.
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Portlet Development using JSF, PrimeFaces and Spring

About the Post:

This article presents techniques on how to develop Java Portlets using JavaServer Faces, PrimeFaces and Spring. This hands-on example will integrate all of these technologies into a single application.

Assumptions

This post assumes that you have a basic understanding of Portlet, JSF, PrimeFaces and Spring. And a good understanding of Java 5 and annotations.

Resources

Before getting started, please have the following downloaded and setup in your environment.

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Maven 3 Tutorial – Project Setup

  • Overview
    • What is Maven?
    • Plugins
    • Why not Ant and Ivy?
    • But It Downloads the Internet
  • Getting Started
    • Install
    • What is a POM?
    • Convention over Configuration
    • New Project
  • Project Management
    • Parent POM
    • Local Maven Repository
    • Multiple Artifacts from a Single Source
    • Release Plugin
    • Aggregate POM
    • Dependency Management
    • Distribution Zip
  • Conclusions

Overview

What is Maven?

Maven is a software project management and comprehension tool that includes: build tools, dependency management, project reporting and much more.  I say “much more” because at the core Maven is a plugin execution framework.  There are plugins supported by the Maven project (http://maven.apache.org/plugins/index.html), plugins supported by Mojo Project (http://mojo.codehaus.org/plugins.html), and third party plugins.  If you can find or write a plugin, Maven can run it.
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