Test Driven Groovy: StubFor

July 23rd, 2014 by Akrem Saed No comments »

After years of being immersed in Java development, I must admit that I got spoiled by its strong and mature ecosystem. Hence, whenever I want to pick up a new technology or programming language the following must be there:

  • Support by my favorite IDE (Eclipse or IntelliJ IDEA)
  • Mature building framework. It does not have to be Maven or Gradle but it needs to be at least better than Ant.
  • Easy TDD. This could be the trickiest one to achieve because not only do I need a testing framework, but it must also be supported by my IDE and build tool. Moreover, it must have an adequate mocking framework.

Groovy easily satisfies those criteria right out of the box. It has awesome support by IntelliJ IDEA, Gradle is written in Groovy and you can write JUnit 3-style unit tests.  


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Automated Plant Watering System

June 24th, 2014 by Stephen Dunn No comments »

Taking care of indoor plants can be work, especially if you have many of them.  As you know water plays a major role in the health of plants, so lets automate it!  Automation of watering plants can be cheap, fun and rewarding. 

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Updated TDD Mantra

June 17th, 2014 by Cecil Williams 1 comment »

If you have ever practiced test driven development (TDD), then you are probably familiar with the TDD mantra – red, green, refactor. I’m a big proponent of TDD, but I think the TDD mantra is missing a fourth step. 

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Customizing CSRF Protection In Spring Security

April 30th, 2014 by Ben Kiefer No comments »

Starting in Spring Security 3.2, developers gained an easy solution to their Cross-Site Request Forgery problems with Spring’s implementation of the Synchronizer Token Pattern. Spring’s documentation does a great job of explaining Synchronizer Token Pattern and their implementation, so rather than talk about all of that, I’m going to show you how to tweak their configuration so you can have greater control over the urls that are protected.

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How to implement the splitter and aggregator patterns with Apache Camel

January 19th, 2014 by Ghaith Alrabadi 2 comments »

I have found that Apache Camel is a good way to load data from log files into a database. Read on to see how I did this using the splitter and aggregator patterns with Apache Camel.


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A Better Analogy For Agile Software Development?

December 30th, 2013 by Cecil Williams 1 comment »

For years, like many of you, I have been comparing software development to construction. But ever since adopting the agile methodology a decade ago, I have been looking for a better analogy to help me explain agile software development. I recently came up with what I think is that analogy – urban planning. Read on to see if you agree.


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SphinxSearch | Full Text Searching

November 21st, 2013 by Stephen Dunn No comments »

This article explains how to use SphinxSE, Sphinx real time indexing, and set up Sphinx in order to improve search query performance.   First some background about issues surrounding full-text search.

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Pizza & Beer: Learning with Atlassian

October 24th, 2013 by Amy Hughes No comments »

Atlassian Summit 2013 Logo

Atlassian Summit 2013 Logo

As a new employee here at Source Allies and a new user to our suite of Atlassian products, I was fortunate, and a little intimidated, to attend Atlassian’s 2013 Summit.  Despite my initial trepidation, I left feeling inspired by what I learned.

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Pain Driven Learning

October 16th, 2013 by David Kessler No comments »
I find that in software development, and also in life, people learn best within the context of painful experiences.  I’m not suggesting that software development mentors go out of their way to create painful experiences for their teams.  On the contrary, just start listening.  It doesn’t take very long to identify pain points within a team.  Equipping teams to solve their own problems is drastically more effective than teaching people the right way to think.   When I teach large groups I often describe my points as hooks or link where they can go back and expand their understanding.  This large-scale map is essential so teams have a shared road map.  But this is rarely enough.
Understanding is built incrementally.  Each hook requires layers of experience and reflection hung upon it to develop a robust context of understanding.  While there are a vast number of reasons that people are motivated to learn, as a mentor I find pain to be a constant source of effective mentoring.  Pain is easy to identify within a group if you take the time to listen.  As a mentor I search for the root causes that set this frustration in motion.  Once I’ve collected and researched a variety of pain points I look for common themes and related root causes.
I remember one team that had a significant trust issue between the business team and the development team.  The most obvious place that this pain point appeared was in the daily stand-up meeting.  The business members were quiet and withdrawn while the development team dominated the conversation.  As I started asking questions I quickly realized that there was a language barrier within the team.  While most everyone on the team grew up in the same country, the developers consistently used technical terms that confused and alienated the non-technical team members.  On top of this divide the technical team regularly used their exclusive knowledge to push decisions through.  After discussing this with the whole team we adopted a “no tech talk” policy at stand-up.  In fact we gave non-technical members cards that they could throw down in the center of the group if the speaker started using terminology that only part of the team understood.
This small but powerful modification significantly changed this team.  The business team stopped reading their emails and texts during stand-up and started engaging in meaningful conversations.  The technical team started translating their technical thoughts into business terms.  Changing how the team communicated not only aligned their conversation with the business, it began to leak into their code.  Constantly thinking about their work in the context of the business helped them create code that reflected the business.  Clearer code reduce unnecessary overhead related to translating business terminology into application terminology.  This increase clarity also cut down wasteful communication overhead and reduced the new team member learning curve.  Aligning this team was not just a feel good moment; it resulted in a critical alignment of their software with the business.
While this example focuses on “soft skills”, pain driven learning is applicable to every part of software development, technical or not.  I focus on pain points because they’re easy to find if you just listen.  The emotion surrounding these problems provides an implicit invitation for a solution.  The act of helping a team solve a problem that they face increases trust and moral.  Once a team believes that they can solve the problems they face, they become emboldened to look at their challenges and take steps to correct them.  These shared experiences draw the team together and provide a powerful environment for developing valuable software.  Mentors earn respect from their teams by helping them identify and overcome issues.  Respect opens avenues for powerful teaching opportunities that extend beyond pain points.
Effective mentoring is not delivered by force.  On the contrary, effective teachers must become students willing to listen and learn.  In the same way that effective software provides value to the customer, effective teaching equips students to keep moving forward.  The correct posture of an effective mentor is humility.
I find that in software development, and also in life, people learn best within the context of painful experiences.  I’m not suggesting that software development mentors go out of their way to create painful experiences for their teams.  On the contrary, just start listening.  It doesn’t take very long to identify pain points within a team.  Equipping teams to solve their own problems is drastically more effective than teaching people the right way to think.   When I teach large groups I often describe my points as hooks or link where they can go back and expand their understanding.  This large-scale map is essential so teams have a shared road map.  But this is rarely enough.

Agile Iowa No Estimates Puzzle Experiment

October 2nd, 2013 by Cecil Williams No comments »
cecil-presenting-agile-iowa-puzzleI facilitated my own rendition of the #NoEstimates Puzzle Experiment for the September 2013 Agile Iowa user group meeting. This experiment was created by Chris Chapman to generate critical thinking and conversation concerning whether estimates are necessary to produce quality software. The meeting had a great turnout, with around 40 people attending during a Midwest thunderstorm that left over 20,000 people without power.

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